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Just Another Tech Blog

Anything and everything having to do with technology, computers, science, and most of all... Linux! The documentation of my Linux endeavor.



The Ultimate Linux Command: lsof

Thursday, September 14, 2006

lsof is the Linux/Unix ├╝ber-tool. I use it most for getting network connection related information from a system, but that's just the beginning for this amazing and little-known application. The tool is aptly called lsof because it "lists open files". And remember, in Unix just about everything (including a network socket) is a file. "

usage: [-?abhlnNoOPRstUvV] [+|-c c] [+|-d s] [+D D] [+|-f[cgG]]
[-F [f]] [-g [s]] [-i [i]] [+|-L [l]] [+|-M] [-o [o]]
[-p s] [+|-r [t]] [-S [t]] [-T [t]] [-u s] [+|-w] [-x [fl]] [--] [names]]


"As you can see, lsof has a truly staggering number of options. You can use it to get information about devices on your system, what a given user is touching at any given point, or even what files or network connectivity a process is using. lsof replaces my need for both netstat and ps entirely. It has everthing I get from those tools and much, much more." Don't worry, the page explains all of these!

Read more!
Visit the lsof homepage!

Note from Nerd: Wow! This is pretty cool! I have never even heard of this command but looks pretty 1337. I have got to try this when I get my computer back up and running (new power supply has been ordered! Should arrive Friday!).
posted by linnerd40, Thursday, September 14, 2006


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